The Global Water Initiative (GWI) was an action-research and advocacy programme that ran from 2008-17. The project is now closed. This site is no longer being updated, but allows access to GWI outputs until 1 October 2020 when it will also close. After that date, information about the project and core GWI technical publications will continue to be available from the IIED website and Publications Library.

  • English
  • Français

Sustainable sanitation

Toolkit for local financing of operating costs and maintenance of water points

English

A major challenge for rural water supply in Africa is ensuring the operation of water points in a sustainable manner. With a view to helping local governments and communities to ensure sustainable access to water and sanitation, between 2008 and 2012 GWI West Africa developed  a series of practical guides to enable beneficiaries and key stakeholders to make informed decisions in relation to the choice of technology and water supply systems that best meets their community's needs.

Sustainability index of rural water services: Burkina Faso and Niger

English

This survey was commissioned by GWI three years after the start of the 2008-2012 programme in West Africa with the aim of assessing the sustainability potential of the rural water services supported by GWI during this period and to learn lessons from governance and management systems. It is part of the ongoing learning and evaluation of GWI's work.

From demonstration latrines to Community Led Total Sanitation (CLTS)

English

In 2008 GWI began a sustainable sanitation project in Burkina Faso, Ghana, Mali, Niger and Senegal. We focused primarily on implementing ‘demonstration latrines’ in rural areas, where the culture of open defecation (OD) and non-hygienic disposal of children’s faeces was widespread. However, demonstration latrines (particularly the government promoted Ventilated Improved Pit latrine) proved ineffective in terms of cost, sustainability and replication.

Practical guide for building a simple pit latrine

English

GWI helped build appropriate, strong, low-cost latrines. This illustrated manual is aimed at community sanitation mobilisers and villagers already motivated to build their own latrines, and it is best used alongside CLTS. It sets out the guiding principles that should be taken in to account with latrine construction and maintenance, such as factors to consider when deciding where to site a latrine. As well as practical advice, the guide contains characters, dialogue and illustrations to bring the content to life.

Report on sustainability of community water and sanitation (WATSAN) committees in NW Ghana

English

GWI commissioned this assessment of Water and Sanitation (WATSAN) committees in the Upper West region of Ghana, 3 years into their operations. Each of the 32 project communities in this region have a WATSAN committee, composed of approximately 9 local people (men and women). We found that the committees vary in their effectiveness: the majority are proactive and resolve most problems themselves, but some are still too dependent on GWI or do not receive adequate support from the relevant authorities.

 

Lessons learned from GWI’s experience of CLTS in Niger

English

GWI are tackling sanitation issues in rural regions of Niger in the lower Tarka valley. Our 2008 ‘demonstration latrine’ project made way, in 2010, for Community Led Total Sanitation (CLTS). CLTS is an approach focussed on empowerment and changing behaviour. This document follows the progress of CLTS in Niger, drawing out noteworthy examples from communities in the Tarka river basin. We show that CLTS has great potential for communities in West Africa where open defecation is commonplace.

From demonstration latrines to Community Led Total Sanitation (CLTS)

English

In 2008 GWI began a sustainable sanitation project in Burkina Faso, Ghana, Mali, Niger and Senegal. We focused primarily on implementing ‘demonstration latrines’ in rural areas, where the culture of open defecation (OD) and non-hygienic disposal of children’s faeces was widespread. However, demonstration latrines (particularly the government promoted Ventilated Improved Pit latrine) proved ineffective in terms of cost, sustainability and replication.