The Global Water Initiative (GWI) was an action-research and advocacy programme that ran from 2008-17. The project is now closed. This site is no longer being updated, but allows access to GWI outputs until 1 October 2020 when it will also close. After that date, information about the project and core GWI technical publications will continue to be available from the IIED website and Publications Library.

  • English
  • Français

Making decentralised institutions work for IWRM

GWI’s approach to Integrated Water Resource Management (IWRM) in our five programme countries was developed in the context of increasing decentralisation across West Africa. This brought both challenges and opportunities. We found public and private sector interests in water to be divergent and often opposing, which made an integrated approach all the more important. Moreover, working in a decentralised environment showed that democracy and transparency are crucial in making local governance structures work efficiently and effectively for IWRM.

We engaged local water authorities as well as representatives of stakeholder-led water committees in planning how best to use and conserve water equitably and sustainably. We facilitated participatory discussions about the management of specific water resources such as check dams, and helped draft agreements for the development and management of water resources at sub-basin level. 

The documents listed below all capitalise on what we have learnt about making decentralised structures work for IWRM.

Publications

 

GWI Niger saw the 3-year milestone as a key moment to assess the impact of its IWRM programme. This report encompasses 2 practical themes: successes seen so far and improvements needed.

In terms of drinking water and sanitation, the general law on decentralised government and the law on water management, including all the associated texts, provide the essential framework for public intervention in the field of water.

Boulis/earth pan reservoirs and their surrounding areas can be used for income generation in Burkina Faso. For example, farmers and pastoralists pay an annual fee (in proportion to the size of their herd) to graze their animals around boulis.

These 3 documents are sample agreements initiated by GWI for the management and protection of natural water resources in the Ndoga Babacar municipality of Senegal’s Tambacounda region.

GWI carried out an evaluation of the effectiveness of village borehole management structures in Burkina Faso. We sampled 12 out of 34 project villages.

These 3 documents are sample agreements initiated by GWI for the management and protection of natural water resources in the Ndoga Babacar municipality of Senegal’s Tambacounda region.

These 3 documents are sample agreements initiated by GWI for the management and protection of natural water resources in the Ndoga Babacar municipality of Senegal’s Tambacounda region.

The Malian Sourou basin has great natural and economic importance, with much potential for ample water provision. But despite this potential, there are still several challenges around water quality and the effective management of water resources.